Prior Post Update

In the comments to my last post, a couple of you mentioned that I need not fear the big Islays.  And truthfully, I don’t.  I figure that loving Highland Park 12 and liking Talisker 10 puts me in a position where I can at least tolerate some of the “dark, peaty side,” as they say.

This evening, I just so happened to find myself in front of the same selection of single malts described below.  I thought to myself, “I do it all for my readers,” and gamely ordered the Lagavulin 16.

Unfortunately, I didn’t have my notebook with me to write down my impressions, although if I did, they would look something like this:

Nose – Mmmmm … aaahhh … hey …. mmmmm.

Taste – Ohhhh … whoah … yes, please … homina homina homina … need … more … Lagavulin…. *sounds of me trying to lick the bottom of the glass*

Finish – *sigh* I’ll have anoth– wait, it costs WHAT?

So maybe it was a little pricy for regular ordering, but a bottle of that juice will be making its way into my cabinet, and soon.  I think LBB will get the message that it just may be a good “birthday bottle,” if you know what I mean.

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Not unrelated to the above, I’m thinking my next bottle purchase will be a nice peaty plunge.  What say you, dear readers, in terms of a favorite of the three big, peaty intro-Islays (as I see them): Ardbeg 10, Caol Ila 12 and Laphroaig 10 (or maybe Quarter Cask)?  Favorites?

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Quick Review – Bowmore Legend

The other day, Little Bitty Bits and I were at our local upscale pizza joint (the kind that serves individual pizzas with fancy toppings).  The place has a little single malt selection that isn’t the worst ever – Glenlivet 12, Glenlivet 15, Glenmorangie Original, Macallan 12, Lagavulin 16 and the Bowmore Legend.  Now, by this visit, I had tried each of those whiskies aside from the the last two.  And from my reading up on whisky in the last few months, here is what I know about them: they are both Islays, the Lagavulin is beloved by many as a great peaty whisky, and the Legend is known for being one of the cheapest good whiskies around.

Faced with this decision, you have to understand two things about me.  First, I am a wimp.  The murderer’s row of Laphroig, Ardbeg, Caol Ila and the like scare me.  Well, they don’t scare me scare me.  I just have a difficult time seeing myself enjoying something that people describe as having the taste of campfire.  Second, I am cheap.  Most of the other pours at this place had run me $9 or $10, and I was hoping to maybe give the wallet a slight break (in the end, though, I think they still charge $8.50 for the Legend).

So as the post title shows, I went with the Legend.  Here are my notes.  They are short and sweet, because drinking this whisky is a pretty short and sweet experience.  On the nose, this reminds me a lot of Johnny Walker Black – a little hit of smoke and some citrus-y sweetness in back.  On the palate, it is very light bodied – almost watery.  Again, you get a little puff of smoke and then a light taste of honey.  Then the show’s over.

Reading back, it sounds like I might have been a little too harsh.  This is a pretty straightforward whisky, not a peat monster.  And it easily passes my “are you pouring it down the drain” test.  It is just … simple.  But for $26 a bottle, I wouldn’t fault anyone on a budget for using it as their go-to Tuesday night sipper.

Really, though, the whole reason for posting this review is so that I can show you this video that I recently stumbled across.  I was on Youtube, checking out some videos by the great Ralfy, and I somehow found an additional review of Bowmore Legend.  I just couldn’t have been more entertained.  Enjoy:

My favorite part of blogging is when some of my visitors talk whisky in the comments.  Almost to a person, they know more than me about the subject, so it is a great learning experience.  So I’ll open it up to you – what are your picks for great whisky values?

I’ll start with a few picks of my own.  Two bottles that I quite enjoy for under $35 locally are Glenmorangie Original and Old Pulteney 12 (WW reviews both upcoming ) (and actually, if I had to settle on just one value bottle, OP12 might be the one).  A couple of dollars higher, and I’m coming to realize that I am all about Highland Park 12 (at $41).

For another data point, we can look to Ryan’s Value Whiskey Reviews.  For his highest value rating, he also lists the Highland Park 12, and also highlights Talisker $10, at $48 per.  What say you, good readers?